Political raises in B.C. should have more oversight

Reader says hypocrisy thrives in the world of politics

To quote Premier Christy Clark: “I am not going back to taxpayers for more money in order to give government workers a raise. We are in very tough economic times and we have to balance our budget.”

First of all, not being a government worker, I am unbiased. However, the sanctimonious tone of the Premier’s statement is mind-boggling.

If she is so concerned about going back to taxpayers for a pay raise for government workers, why doesn’t she express those same sentiments when the politicians vote themselves a substantial wage increase whenever they like?

They don’t even have to justify it to anyone, least of all the taxpayers, who are paying for them.

Have they ever voted to not to give themselves a raise?

That would make a dent in helping to balance the budget.

They should be ashamed that they continue to vote themselves raises, regardless of tough economic times, while denying others.

But, unfortunately, I don’t think they are capable of feeling shame. The practice of voting themselves raises needs to be abolished.

They are civil servants and should not have this power, with no oversight or justification. This is a practice that is long overdue for change. Why isn’t someone calling for this to be done, if only in the name of fairness, if nothing else?

Just last week I read about the Legislative Clerk (supposedly a consultant) in their employ and no one could say exactly what his job was. Where was his job description?

But no, they admit to paying (or I should say taxpayers are paying) him salary and perks, completely unaware of his function.

Is it any wonder people have become thoroughly disillusioned with politics, and are failing to vote.

The only reason I still vote is that I honour the women who fought so hard to get the vote, but I do it with a heavy heart because I see that greed and hypocrisy thrive in the world of politics.

Elaine Sheridan

Victoria

 

 

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