Canadian’s shame over Syria is misplaced

Many other global hotspots require Canada's support as well as Syria

Re: Children victimized in Syrian civil war (Letters, Oct. 12)

I must reject Rachelle Dallaire’s naive postulation concerning the obligation of Canada’s government and media with regard to the plight of children in war-torn Syria.

In proclaiming to be “ashamed to be Canadian” because not enough is being done, she clearly shows that she has her head buried in the sand and is ignoring that there are millions of disabled, sick and starving people in many other parts of the world (including Canada) with equal claim to our attentions and support.

As in most things, there have to be priorities and working with these is the only way to progress and succeed, rather than chasing around the globe like headless chickens, trying to save the whole world at a stroke.

There is only so much that governments and international aid organizations can achieve and it is abundantly clear that they are doing everything possible within the limits placed upon them.

For example, to reach the wretched people (children and adults) whose lives are being devastated in the Middle East, the problems are often not just a matter of enthusiasm, funding and logistics on the part of the givers, but rather the integrity, goodwill and trust at the receiving end. If  peacekeeping forces cannot secure safe passage in those countries, then what chance is there for anyone else.

Finally, I suggest it is nonsense to lambast the media for not pleading the plight of Syria’s children.

Their job is to report the facts so that we, as well as the likes of Stephen Harper, are moved to support the multitude of amazing people around the world who are already doing,  in an organized and effective way, what Ms. Dallaire craves.

I fear the lady’s “shame” is both misplaced and misleading.

Derrick Johns

Oak Bay

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