It is not clear when the portrait of Queen Elizabeth II will return to Sidney’s council chamber (Wolf Depner/News Staff)

Sidney’s queen’s portrait announcement expected before Christmas

Return awaits completion of town crest, First Nations artwork

It is not clear yet when a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II will return to council chambers.

Randy Humble, Sidney’s chief administrative officer, said Mayor Cliff McNeil-Smith will “have further announcements” about the portrait, as well as a piece of Aboriginal art and the town crest, during his Mayor’s Report at a council meeting in the coming weeks before Christmas.

When asked for comment, McNeil-Smith said he has no further comment at this time, referring instead to Humble’s statement.

Council is scheduled to have regular meetings on Dec. 2 and Dec. 16 with a committee of the whole meeting on Dec. 9.

Humble said in earlier emails that “we look forward to having the portrait back within the next few weeks” along with the town crest. “The First Nations piece has taken a bit longer than anticipated,” he said. He did not give specific reasons for the delay.

RELATED: Sidney’s acting mayor says no one noticed removal of Queen’s portrait

RELATED: Sidney Mayor Cliff McNeil-Smith issues apology over removal of Queen portrait

READ ALSO: Monarchist League of Canada calls Sidney’s removal of Queen’s portrait ‘lamentable’

McNeil-Smith last month apologized for changes in the decor of council chambers that included the removal of a portrait of Elizabeth II. He said in the statement that it was his decision to remove the portrait. “I decided to temporarily take it down until the Sidney Town Crest and First Nations piece were ready to go up together with the Portrait,” he said.

While the statement did not give an exact date, McNeil-Smith earlier talked about that happening in December.

McNeil-Smith said in his statement that he visited many communities with crests hanging prominently in their council chambers. “I believe it would be most appropriate to have the Sidney Town Crest hang on the wall behind me,” he said.

The mayor said in his remarks that Sidney commissioned a crest in the late 1960s. A large carving hung in council chambers for many years until it became damaged. A small replica of an updated crest currently sits on his desk.

McNeil-Smith’s statement also addressed the question of why he did not leave the portrait behind him or move elsewhere until the town crest and First Nations piece were ready.

“To be honest, giving the First Nations territorial acknowledgement felt empty with only the portrait, which yes, represents our Constitutional Monarchy, but is also seen as a symbol of our colonial past,” he said, in pointing to the Canadian Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which he says speaks of “decolonization and reconciliation.”

wolfgang.depner@peninsulanewsreview.com


Like us on Facebook and follow @wolfgang_depner

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Warm “blob” could be behind mass starvation of North Pacific seabirds: Study

Unprecedented death toll raises red flag for North American marine ecosystems

Victoria’s reconciliation dialogue on newcomers, Indigenous peoples takes place Monday

The third of six discussions on reconciliation will take place at the Crystal Garden

Former Sidney mayor calls on local MLA Adam Olsen to resign over protests

Olsen has rejected the demand, calling Price’s language divisive and responsible for polarization

Six boat wrecks wash up on Cadboro Bay beaches over the weekend

Dead Boat Society working with Oak Bay, Saanich to clear derelict boats

UPDATED: One-sailing wait from Swartz Bay ferry terminal after morning protest

Movement in solidarity with Wet’suwet’en First Nation

ICBC to bring in ranking system for collision, glass repair shops

Change comes after the much-maligned auto insurer has faced criticism for sky-high premiums

Surrey’s ‘Pink Palace’ being used for Stephen King horror shoot

New web series based on King’s The Stand novel

‘It was just so fast’: B.C. teen recalls 150-metre fall down Oregon mountain

Surrey’s Gurbaz Singh broke his leg on Mount Hood on Dec. 30

Vancouver Island Pride weekend returns to Mount Washington Alpine Resort

Building on the success of last year’s family-friendly pride festival on Vancouver… Continue reading

Scarlett Point lighthouse keeper wins a million bucks playing the lottery

“I usually just get a quick pick, so I didn’t expect to win a big prize”

Poll suggests some don’t think Canada should send troops to stop genocide

The findings are being released just before the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz

B.C. woman crowned the fastest female marathon runner in Canadian history

Malindi Elmore ran an incredible 2:24:50 at the Houston Marathon

Alberta bulldog breeder ordered to give refund to B.C. buyer due to puppy’s behaviour

Tribunal ruled a verbal agreement to send a new dog superseded the written contract

Most Read