Seven-year-old Ryder Heron and his four-year-old brother Logan Heron flank their mother Chantal Gore-Langton, who wants the provincial government to settle with striking support workers in School District, where Ryder attends Sidney Elementary School. (Wolf Depner/News Staff)

Sidney mother says ongoing school strike threatens budget

Chantal Gore-Langton calls on both sides to resolve dispute

For Chantal Gore-Langton, the ongoing school strike is more than just a frustrating, stressful inconvenience. It is also a strain on her budget.

The single mother from Sidney said she spent $72 over two days to put the older of her two sons, seven-year-old Ryder, into day camps offered by Panorama Recreation Centre. When added up over a whole week, Gore-Langton could be looking at bill of $180 or more if the strike continues, no small figure by any stretch, especially for a singe mother.

“Being a single mom, it is incredibly difficult,” she said. “I don’t have a lot of extra money to be throwing around. Yes, he has a pass, but it doesn’t make it any easier trying to get him up there and back and trying to get him into the courses.”

RELATED: Bargaining resumes in Saanich School District strike, classes still cancelled

Gore-Langton, like so many other parents affected by the strike of support workers represented by CUPE Local 441 in SD63, has been relying on a network of support, including family members, to provide care for her children with school out.

“He [her son] should be in school,” she said. “There should be no reason why the government can’t make amends, give the support staff what they are requesting, which is legitimately fair across the board, and get the kids back into school,” she said.

Along the way, she has shared her frustrations with other parents and officials including local MLA Adam Olsen.

“I feel, as a tax paying citizen, that my tax dollars should be going towards the teachers and support staff pay rather than putting kids in day camps or child care,” she said in a letter to his office.

RELATED: Pay disparity at heart of Saanich schools strike has 45-year-old roots

Gore-Langton said both sides could have resolved the disputes a long time ago and her loyalties lie clearly with the striking support staff, who deserve the same pay as their peers in other school districts.

“Instead they are forced to strike, leaving us parents scrambling to find child care for our children so we can still go to work to pay for these taxes spent on picket lines and out of school care for our kids,” she said.

Both sides have resumed negotiations, but no settlement has been reached yet.


Like us on Facebook and follow @wolfgang_depner

wolfgang.depner@peninsulanewsreview.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Central Saanich’s Keating Elementary completes seismic upgrades

Sidney Elementary and North Saanich’s Deep Cove Elementary still waiting for seismic upgrades

Province offers expertise to help Esquimalt clean up Gorge oil spill

A leaky home heating tank shed oil into ground and storm water systems

B.C. men’s life expectancy down for a third straight year

Opioid crisis held responsible for declining life expectancy

Victoria councillors advocate once again for free youth transit passes regionally

The idea was originally rejected by the Victoria Regional Transit Commission in August 2019

Langford ranks as fastest growing community in B.C.

Westshore community grew by 5.2 per cent in 2019 compared to 2018

B.C. reports first coronavirus in Vancouver region

First patient visited Wuhan, China, reported symptoms

Greater Victoria’s wanted list for the week of Jan. 28

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Watch out for scams, clickbait in the wake of Kobe Bryant’s death: Better Business Bureau

Kobe Bryant and his daughter were killed in a helicopter crash near Los Angeles

‘Very disrespectful’: Headstones at Okanagan cemetery damaged by excavation crew

Headstones at Enderby’s Cliffside Cemetery mistakenly driven over by excavation crew

Despite reports of decline, birds flocking to national parks in Canadian Rockies

Recent studies suggest overall bird population has slid by three billion since 1970

Former UN committee member defends stance on B.C.’s Coastal GasLink pipeline

First Nations LNG Alliance accused UN committee, human rights watchdog of not doing their research

Earthquake on top of highway closure a wake up call for Island’s West Coast

“When someone says, ‘Be prepared for 72 hours,’ that means exactly that: be prepared.”

Pregnant B.C. woman stuck in Wuhan, the epicentre of coronavirus outbreak

Woman is due to give birth in Wuhan, China unless she can get out

Most Read