Central Saanich Mayor Ryan Windsor, here seen second from left during the unveiling of solar panels on the top of Fire Hall No. 1 earlier this summer, says the wider community also needs to play its part in reducing climate change causing greenhouse gas emissions. (Black Press File).

Central Saanich mayor wants to electrify vehicle fleet

Mayor Ryan Windsor also calls on community to step up efforts

While the mayor of Central Saanich is pleased to see the municipality achieve carbon neutrality, more work lies ahead.

“That [carbon neutrality] is our target in our climate plan,” said Mayor Ryan Windsor. “We always have more work to do, both internally and externally, to continue to improve as a community.”

The accomplishment recognized by the standards of the Climate Action Recognition Program means the municipality will be able to brand itself carbon neutral for use on official websites and letterheads. Under the program, local governments must fulfill the public reporting requirements (including reporting progress to carbon neutrality) of the Climate Action Revenue lncentive Program (CARIP).

RELATED: District of Central Saanich achieved carbon neutrality in 2018

RELATED: Central Saanich accused of not following Climate Emergency declaration with urgent action

RELATED: Youth activism pushes Central Saanich to declare ‘climate emergency’

RELATED: Central Saanich Fire Dept. now sun powered – good for budget and environment

Central Saanich also achieved carbon neutrality in 2017, 2016 and 2015 as it has been pursuing a number of initiatives during the last decade, dating back to the adoption of the Central Saanich Energy Plan in 2008, to reduce the emissions of climate-change causing greenhouses gases (GHGs), with some voices like Coun. Zeb King calling for more action.

This achievement does not mean that all of Central Saanich has achieved carbon-neutrality. Officials generally distinguish between corporate greenhouse gas emissions and community-wide emissions, with corporate emissions representing only a relatively small share, as it is in the case of Central Saanich.

Transportation and housing account for the

One municipal area where Windsor would like to see future action concerns conversion of the vehicle fleet towards electric vehicles.

“My hope is that in the next few years, we will get the opportunity to purchase things electric pick-up trucks,” he said.

While market forces will help shape this process, the municipality must be ready to purchase those vehicles once they become available, he said.

Central Saanich, he said, is also still working on a plan that would allow Central Saanich residents to retrofit their homes.

“We don’t have a final answer to that question yet, but it is important obviously,” he said, with any future plan having to balance affordability with effectiveness.

This said, Central Saanich as municipality can only do so much to reduce GHGs, said Windsor.

“We have to look at the wider community as well,” he said. “How do we work with the broader community to improve and reduce the emissions from transportation and buildings.”


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

wolfgang.depner@peninsulanewsreview.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Telus headquarters to come to Victoria in ‘landmark building’ development

City sells land on coroner of Douglas and Humboldt streets for $8.1 million

Victoria man identified as victim in Thunder Bay murder

Police investigating after Paul Vivier, 29, discovered in hotel

Fire at Victoria hotel contained to one room, leaves 20 suites in need of remediation

Fire crews extinguished the blaze at the Comfort Inn in 12 minutes

Firefighters called for technical rescue at Sooke Potholes

Woman breaks her leg while walking along riverbed

About 30% of B.C. students return to schools as in-class teaching restarts amid pandemic

Education minister noted that in-class instruction remains optional

Be cautious expanding COVID-19 bubble, Dr. Bonnie Henry tells B.C.

Senior homes stay off-limits as schools, businesses reopen

Trudeau avoids questions about anti-racism protesters dispersed for Trump photo-op

Prime minister says racism is an issue Canadians must tackle at home, too

Considerations made to keep Island community’s drive-by birthday celebrations going

Trucks will tone it down or not use horns at all to bring some joy to kids and older folks

Summer tubing ban on Cowichan River lifted

The Tube Shack opening on June 27

NDP getting COVID-19 wage subsidy ‘indirectly,’ B.C. Liberal leader says

B.C. NDP says Andrew Wilkinson is wrong about federal link

Parent, superintendent, trustee report smooth return to classrooms in B.C.

The biggest challenge is convincing families that it’s safe, some say

Most Read