Plumbing the depths of the Salish Sea

Elizabeth May set to inspire and educate with key note presentation at Raincoast Conservation Foundation.

  • Apr. 22, 2015 5:00 a.m.

Raincoast Conservation Foundation biologist Misty MacDuffee samples juvenile salmon on the Ecstall River. MacDuffee will be speaking at the upcoming “Celebrating the Salish Sea” evening of science at the Mary Winspear Centre April 25.

The Raincoast Conservation Foundation is hosting an entertainment-laced evening of Salish Sea inspired scientific talks next week, with Saanich-Gulf Islands MP Elizabeth May giving the key note presentation on how to protect the Salish Sea, southern resident killer whales and all of B.C.’s coastal waters.

Raincoast biologist Misty MacDuffee will open the evening after a welcome from Adam Olsen from the Tsartlip First Nation. She will address current threats to the ecosystem, in particular those relating to the killer whale population.

The evening will offer up “a really interesting and in-depth presentation about the ecological values of the Salish Sea and what it means to the region,” said Chris Genovali, executive director of the Raincoast Conservation Foundation. “And a good overview of the Kinder Morgan trans-mountain proposal and the threats it poses.”

In addition to the talks, the foundation is also screening Directly Affected, a short documentary about the proposed pipeline.

“It’s been a very unfortunate situation, in that there was an attempt to fast track this project and its approval, and in doing so it’s created even more controversy,” said Genovali.

He explained there have been no oral testimonies accepted, no cross examinations allowed of expert interveners on either side, and a “severely truncated process.”

The film is the Foundation’s effort to address some of those issues.

Ultimately, it’s about “having a frank conversation about the challenges that the Salish Sea is facing in the coming years,” said Genovali.

“Celebrating the Salish Sea” begins at 6 p.m. at the Charlie White Theatre at the Mary Winspear Centre with a reception to meet the scientists, view non-governmental organization displays and visit the bar. Presentations and musical entertainment begin at 7 p.m. Elizabeth May will be taking questions after her presentation.

Tickets are $13.15, available at the box office, at marywinspear.ca or by calling 250-656-0275.

For more information, visit raincoast.org.

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