Long-time treasure hunter Werner Streicek shows off a bit of gold he discovered. He and his daughters are set to begin their first full season of mining in the Cariboo region starting this summer. (Adam Louis/Observer)

Long-time treasure hunter Werner Streicek shows off a bit of gold he discovered. He and his daughters are set to begin their first full season of mining in the Cariboo region starting this summer. (Adam Louis/Observer)

Harrison Hot Springs treasure hunter eyes gold in the Cariboo region

Werner Streicek will rely on decades of mining experience to create legacy for family

It’s been about 40 years in the making, and Harrison Hot Springs resident and long-time miner Werner Streicek is ready to start a new adventure.

Streicek and his daughters Madeline and Josephine, are preparing to begin a gold-mining operation in central B.C.

Streicek, who has decades of mining experience, discovered and confirmed virgin paleochannel – or the sediment-filled remains of an inactive stream or river with high potential for gold – after several site visits in the Cariboo region in the late 80s and early 90s. After a couple of months of initial setup and groundwork in 2021, the mine is expected to begin its first full season next month.

READ ALSO: Local miner eyes Bear Mountain for gold

The first full season will focus on removing quartz boulders as well as the clay slurry that has settled in the area. The boulders are part of what Streicek called a longer “boulder train” – river-polished quartz boulders that he says are an excellent indicator for a rich gold deposit.

Streicek said he’s always been a passionate treasure hunter since his youth, growing up in Austria and mining all over the world. He added the rising price of gold and the continued popularity of the precious metal have led him and his daughters to be optimistic about their venture’s outcome.

READ ALSO: B.C. mine laws must conform to UN rights, Indigenous group says

Streicek sees this mine as a legacy for his family. In turn, his daughters see the mine as an opportunity for women and young people to become well-versed in the art and science of mining.

The project’s lifespan is said to be between 15 and 20 years.


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