Political raises should have more oversight

Is it any wonder people have become thoroughly disillusioned with politics?

To quote Premier Christy Clark: “I am not going back to taxpayers for more money in order to give government workers a raise. We are in very tough economic times and we have to balance our budget.”

The sanctimonious tone of the Premier’s statement is mind-boggling.

If she is so concerned about going back to taxpayers for a pay raise for government workers, why doesn’t she express those same sentiments when the politicians vote themselves a substantial wage increase whenever they like?

They don’t even have to justify it to anyone, least of all the taxpayers, who are paying for them. Have they ever voted to not to give themselves a raise? That would make a dent in helping to balance the budget.

They should be ashamed that they continue to vote themselves raises, regardless of tough economic times, while denying others. But, unfortunately, I don’t think they are capable of feeling shame. The practice of voting themselves raises needs to be abolished.

They are civil servants and should not have this power, with no oversight or justification. This is a practice that is long overdue for change. Why isn’t someone calling for this to be done, if only in the name of fairness, if nothing else?

Just last week I read about the Legislative Clerk (supposedly a consultant) in their employ and no one could say exactly what his job was. Where was his job description?

But no, they admit to paying (or I should say taxpayers are paying) him salary and perks, completely unaware of his function.

Is it any wonder people have become thoroughly disillusioned with politics, and are failing to vote.

The only reason I still vote is that I honour the women who fought so hard to get the vote, but I do it with a heavy heart because I see that greed and hypocrisy thrive in the world of politics.

Elaine Sheridan, Victoria

 

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Patrick brothers who shaped modern hockey also tried, but failed, to remove violence

New history thesis shows efforts to sell a “clean game” in Oak Bay

Victoria man to run marathon after overcoming rare cancer diagnosis

Nigel Deacon was diagnosed with ocular melanoma in 2010

Burger sales bring in $5,000 to build Imagination Libraries in Greater Victoria

United Way of Greater Victoria and Big Wheel Burger team up to get kids reading

Donated sculpture in Sidney’s Beacon Park a testament to perseverance

Victoria artist Armando Barbon picked up sculpting 22 years ago

Sidney builds community resilience through neighbourhood gatherings

Meet Your Street needs residents to create gatherings, safe interactions

QUIZ: A celebration of apples

September is the start of the apple harvest

POLL: Do you plan on allowing your children to go trick or treating this year?

This popular annual social time will look quite different this year due to COVID-19

Ferry riders say lower fares are what’s most needed to improve service

Provincial government announces findings of public engagement process

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87

The court’s second female justice, died Friday at her home in Washington

Comox Valley protesters send message over old-growth logging

Event in downtown Courtenay was part of wider event on Friday

Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Application deadline for fish harvester benefits program extended

Those financially impacted by the pandemic have until Oct. 5 to apply

VIDEO: B.C. to launch mouth-rinse COVID-19 test for kids

Test involves swishing and gargling saline in mouth and no deep-nasal swab

Most Read