OUR VIEW: Remembrance front and centre

Without a doubt, those people willingly carry a heavy burden and for that they deserve to be recognized.

As we remember Canada’s servicemen and women this Friday, November 11, each of us will have an individual, or a group of individuals, in our mind during the minute of silence that was started in the aftermath of the First World War.

The ceremony of Remembrance Day is a small token of our esteem and appreciation for the service given — and at times, the sacrifices made — by the people who wear the uniform and represent our country in times of conflict.

Without a doubt, those people willingly carry a heavy burden and for that they deserve to be recognized.

Yet in every conflict, there are those who are impacted by the fighting, the occupation or even just the absence of family members who are acting on behalf of their nation.

In the lead up to this year’s Remembrance Day coverage in the PNR, we were contacted by reader Brenda Harfield. She feels it’s important not to forget people like her. She was very young during the Second World War and remembers going to kindergarten in England, carrying her very own gas mask. They would go to class, not knowing if the bombs would be falling that day. If they were, they’d be hurried off to bomb shelters, where they would sing songs. She said she remembers feeling happy to see the planes heading back over the English Channel — no more bombs that day!

Within her own family, her husband — as a child in England — had his own school bombed. His brothers were part of the essential service of shipbuilding for the war effort.

Her point is that not all remembrance stories are about fighting on the front lines.

There are plenty of stories about people who stayed behind and did their bit to support the troops — or simply to help keep each other alive. Many others were only children during times of war, yet still carry with them the memories or traumas of those days.

Remembrance takes many forms and this Friday, each of us will take enough time to think of what has come before now, and what may come after. Either way, it’s the people affected by conflict that should be front and centre.

Just Posted

Saanich Peninsula Hospital Foundation looks to grow funding for memory garden

Foundation will start new campaign next month as it wraps up recruitment campaign

B.C. Lions hype-man marks 15 years of cheers

Crazy P cheers, chants, bangs his drum and spreads a message of love

Survey says 27% of Victoria employers look to hire this quarter

Another 13 % of employers anticipate cutbacks

UPDATED: Heavy police presence in Victoria had part of Bay Street blocked off

Bay Street east of Quadra Street was blocked off on Saturday

VIDEO: Grizzly bears fight along northern B.C. highway in rare footage

Cari McGillivray posted the head-turning video, shot near Stewart, B.C., to social media

VIDEO: A moment to remember during the World Lacrosse Men’s Indoor World Championship in B.C.

Diego Hernandez Valenzuela’s team lost, but he felt like a winner Saturday

Handgun crackdown, health spending and transit plans latest campaign promises

Friday was the end of a busy week on the campaign trail

B.C. woman photographs massive ant swarm on Abbotsford driveway

She asked what the ants were doing? The answer: war

Iconic 90s TV show ‘Friends’ celebrates 25th anniversary

The iconic, decade-long television show aired its first episode 25 years ago today

Police arrest B.C. phone scammer linked to illegal call centres in India

Person arrested in Burnaby here on a work visa, says police

Air Canada forced girl, 12, to remove hijab: civil rights group

The San Francisco Bay Area office of the Council on American-Islamic Relations calling for change

Man from Winnipeg who was hiking alone found dead in Banff National Park

RCMP say the man was hiking alone on Mount Temple Thursday

Most Read