Sharon Noble

Smart meter class action suit fails

Effect from thousands of wireless meters impossible to assess against other radio frequency emission sources

The B.C. Supreme Court has dismissed an application by anti-smart meter activists to certify a class action suit against BC Hydro’s use of the wireless meters.

It’s the latest defeat for opponents of wireless meters, whose claims of health hazards have also been rejected by the B.C. Utilities Commission and the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal.

In her June 12 decision, Justice Elaine Adair agreed with BC Hydro expert Dr. Benjamin Cotts that it would be impossible to assess a “common issue” of thousands of customers’ exposure to radio frequency exposure, because of endless variations in distance and wall materials separating people from meters.

Cotts also noted that in addition to radio frequency emissions from radio stations, cell phones, baby monitors, TV and weather radar, natural sources including lightning, other humans and the Earth itself make the assessment of meter emissions impractical.

BC Hydro said in a statement it is pleased by the decision on a wireless electricity system that has “realized $100 million in benefits in the first three years of the program, including reductions in electricity theft.”

The proposed representative plaintiffs in the class action application included Nomi Davis, who operates a yoga and healing centre business in her home, and Sharon Noble, a long-time protester against wireless meters.

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