New Sidney welcome sign could soon see the light of day

Denis Paquette may see his decade-long vision for a grand directional sign come to fruition yet.

Denis Paquette may see his decade-long vision for a grand directional sign come to fruition yet.

The owner of the Sidney Waterfront Inn has been trying to see changes in the welcome and directional signage in the Town of Sidney — especially at the Town’s international ferry terminal — for years. He had even taken it upon himself to at one time revise existing signs, in an attempt to direct visitors into Sidney proper, instead of bypassing the community.

On Monday night, his dream for a sign that better directs visitors into the community moved a big step closer to reality.

Yet even Paquette would admit that his goal for a wayfinding sign at the Anacortes Ferry terminal could have gone by the wayside again.

Sidney town council had considered dropping the project from its budget this year and re-allocating $15,000 in its economic development fund to a new plan to build a pedestrian shelter in park space next to the terminal.

Paquette made a last-minute plea to speak with council Monday night at their committee meeting. He admitted that the group he was working with on designs had dragged its feet on an updated model that was less expensive than their first option from a few months ago.

However, their latest design was less expensive — yet Paquette said it, at between $25,000 and $27,000 — is still expected to exceed the Town’s budget of $15,000.

“It’s achievable,” he said.

Mayor Steve Price suggested that the price tag would be too high and that Town staff should search for other sources of money within the budget to pay for the sign.

Councillor Peter Wainwright, however, said he was not comfortable with using economic development money for a shelter which has almost no relationship to that portfolio.

“I feel a shelter is not an economic development function,” he said, suggesting that staff look to the budget surplus fund to cover the cost of the shelter.

Wainwright added he was okay with using the $15,000 already earmarked for the sign for its intended purpose.

While it was noted the proposed sign was more expensive than planned, councillors felt both the municipality and perhaps the business community could step up to pay the balance.

“We need to have a proper sign up there,” said Coun. Barbara Fallot. “I’d rather find the money for it, than for the shelter.”

Price asked if the sign’s price range was firm and Paquette assured him it was.

Council voted to keep the money allocated to the sign  — and start work on it this year — and come up with an estimated $12,000 out of surplus of contingency funds.

The shelter, too, is expected to be completed this year as part of park and sidewalk upgrades along First Street.

Just Posted

Sidney Museum donates 60,000 Lego bricks to local schools

Sidney, Deep Cove, ḰELSET, Brentwood, Keating and Cordova Bay elementary schools get Lego avalanche

Victoria City Council approves inclusionary housing policy

After years of back and forth, the policy will be ratified in two weeks

Filipino Heritage Month event takes over Centennial Square

Dancing, music and food highlight Mabuhay Day celebration in Victoria

West Shore residents report finding anti-SOGI 123 flyers in mailboxes

SD62 trustee Ravi Parmar says the flyers are ‘garbage’

Victoria Weekender: What’s happening this weekend, June 15-16

Car Free YYJ, a barber battle and an Outdoor Discovery Day

Homalco tour gives glimpse into area’s ‘People, Land, Water’

First Nation business mixes cultural components with wildlife excursions

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

Monkey spotted on late-night jaunt in Campbell River

Conservation officers also apparently looking for cougar in the area

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

Most Read