The Sea Bluff Trail is on Stillmeadow Farm’s private land. (Provided by Violaine Mitchell)

Metchosin aims to enforce dog leash rule after dog attacks on sheep farm

Stillmeadow Farm loses three to five sheep every year due to loose dogs

In an effort to protect sheep from dog attacks, the District of Metchosin will be putting up several signs early next week stating dogs need to be on-leash when using the Sea Bluff Trail that runs on the Stillmeadow Farm.

Metchosin Mayor John Ranns says along with the three signs being placed at each entry point on the trail, the District has also asked Animal Control to have a higher presence.

The move comes after a number of recent attacks at the farm. Violaine Mitchell, owner of the farm, told Black Press Media that she loses three to five sheep every year to dog attacks.

RELATED: Metchosin farmer frustrated over ‘nightmare’ of off-leash dogs near livestock

Ranns says if dog owners don’t abide by the rules, animal control can issue tickets in the range of about $100.

In addition to the new signs, Ranns has also asked the Agriculture Advisory Committee and the Parks Advisory Committee to look at other trails in Metchosin that may need to have on-leash rules. He says with more people coming from other municipalities to walk their dogs in the area, the issue needs to be addressed. Those committees are expected to come back with recommendations in the coming months.

RELATED: Metchosin considers dog ban after most recent sheep attack

“It’s not like your dog has to be a pitbull to kill sheep, your dog can be any kind of dog [and still harm the sheep],” says Rann. “They can be run to death, they don’t have to be bitten or torn apart. They can have heart palpitations [and die] — I’ve seen it myself.”

Leading up to the decisions, Mitchell had a number of handwritten signs on her property and even went to far as to provide twine for owners to use if they were in need of a leash. In one week she had about five altercations with dog owners, and in one incident spent half an hour trying to get a loose dog under control that was chasing the sheep.



kendra.crighton@blackpress.ca

Follow us on Instagram
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

COVID-19: Victoria plumbing company dedicates van for grocery delivery

The Super Plumber uses van to pick up groceries for those in need during COVID-19 pandemic

Food safety a good practice amid COVID-19 concerns

BC Centre for Disease Control offers useful food safe information for households

Fictionalized accounts of pandemics offer glimpses into our COVID-19 present

Contagion might capture the contemporary mood, but pandemics have a long tradition in fiction

Sidney to engage in unique experiment with virtual forum

Virtual ‘meet and greet’ will take place between 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.

B.C. announces $3M for food banks to increase capacity during COVID-19

It is not clear how much of the money will flow towards Greater Victoria food banks

COVID-19: A message from the publisher

We will be making some changes to our print editions during these unprecedented times

No plans to call in military right now to enforce COVID-19 quarantine: Trudeau

Trudeau unveils $7.5M for Kids Help Phone, $9M for vulnerable seniors amid COVID-19

QUIZ: How much do you know about the Olympics?

Put your knowledge to the test with these 12 questions

B.C. is seeing the highest rate of COVID-19 recovery in Canada, and there’s a few reasons why

British Columbia was one of the first to see rise in COVID-19 cases, and has also switched up testing

World COVID-19 update: U.S. expects 100,000 deaths; Oregon declares disaster

Comprehensive update of world news for Sunday, March 19.

B.C. Ferries passengers staying away, as asked, during COVID-19 pandemic

Ferry corporation says ridership down 70-80 per cent over the last week and a half

Sewers stitch masks to free up supplies for front-line health-care workers

“We have little old ladies sewing up a storm,” said Joan Davis

Experts weigh in on best handling of groceries during COVID-19 pandemic

Study suggests the virus can live for up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to three days on plastic

Most Read