A baby Nigerian Dwarf goat participates in her first-ever yoga class. (Peninsula News Review File)

Lavender Farm brings back goat yoga with extra cuddles

No kidding, classes cut but goat cuddling sessions now available

Goat yoga is baaa-ck at Lavender Farm this summer, but now with extra cuddles.

Owner Alan Mayfield has been hosting the goat yoga classes for three years, but because of his retirement cut the four classes a week to one.

“It’s fun. The only people who are disappointed are those expecting some kind of zen-like experience,” laughs Mayfield.

ALSO READ: Dog portrait artist launches quirky clothing line

“If you’re a sort of Mahatma Gandhi type, you just shake your head and walk away, as there’s baby goats bouncing all over you, which kind of detracts from the state of zen those people strive for.”

Regular visitors will know that the standard of yoga is high, but interaction with wobbly balls of cuddle are part of the experience.

“This year we acknowledged the fact that many of the students who come are not here for the yoga, they’re here for the interaction with the baby goats, so we started goat cuddling classes too.”

For $25 you can have an hour of yoga and 30 minutes of goat cuddling, or you can skip the bendy stuff and go in for just the goat cuddling, for less than half the price.

ALSO READ: Sidney Fire shows off the new Community Safety Building

Yoga takes place Saturdays at 10 a.m., with Goat Cuddling priced at $10 for adults and $5 for kids, happening between 2–4 p.m. Lavender Farm run free private Sunday morning sessions with the children of Victoria Autism.

Mayfield says their season started May 4 and although there was an initial rush to book classes, demand drops for a couple of weeks before the summer break. He advises any yogis preferring a quieter class to book before the summer. The season finishes on Labour Day.

“We schedule the birthing of the babies throughout the summer so we have a steady supply of the little ones, like for example, last night I birthed quadruplets, which was quite amazing.”

Mayfield laughs when asked what people are most curious about.

“The biggest question people have is ‘what happens to the babies at the end of the season?’” he says.

ALSO READ: B.C. group on the hunt for Cadboro Bay sea monster

“Two things happen. The particular breed, called the Nigerian Dwarf, is absolutely useless for meat as they’re so small and that’s its saving grace, and they also have the richest milk. So their future lies in cheese production. So the females go to dairy herds where they live out their life, and secondly the males go as farm pets, usually to family farms with children as they’re incredibly socialized by the end of the summer, and come over wanting to be picked up like little toddlers.”

So no lies to children about them going to a nice farm on a hill, when really they’re for the pot?

“It’s nice to have really good, and truthful, answers,” says Mayfield wryly.

To book call (250) 857-2525 or for more information visit facebook.com/goatyogavictoria.



nick.murray@peninsulanewsreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Royal BC Museum joins home education trend with outreach programs

Free webinar options available for RBCM@Home and kids’ programs, starting March 31

Victoria councillors propose waiving parkade fees to support essential workers

Motion coming to committee of the whole for consideration

Woman comes home to ‘entirely different’ Victoria after cruise ship, military base quarantine

Melanie Sibbitt booked herself a last-minute vacation on a cruise ship hit by COVID-19

Victoria brewery uses 3D-printer to make face shields for health care workers

Phillips Brewing is teaming up with engineers to create single-use medical equipment

B.C. records first at-home death from COVID-19, but 70+ hospital patients have recovered

Total of 970 novel coronavirus cases in B.C., with the majority in the Lower Mainland area

BC Ferries able to restrict travel for sick passengers

Ferries working on schedule shifts to keep workers safe

Canadian ferry operators call for inclusion in COVID-19 travel restrictions

Domestic travel restrictions should include ferries, operators say

COVID-19: A message from the publisher

We will be making some changes to our print editions during these unprecedented times

Pay parking suspended at B.C. hospitals due to COVID-19

Temporary free parking reduces need for keypads, contact

Canada expands 75% wage subsidy to COVID-19 affected businesses of all sizes: Trudeau

Program will provide up to $847 per week for each worker

Helping those at risk, one piece of paper at a time through ‘isolation communication’

Simple paper tool during pandemic making its way across Canada thanks to social media.

‘Back to school, in a virtual way’ for B.C. students in COVID-19 pandemic

Province adds online resources to help parents at home

Most Read