A backhoe clearing snow from the roadway in Sidney. Some of the snow drifts are more than a metre high. (Nick Murray/News Staff)

Drainage a concern due to melting snow in Sidney

Businesses mostly all open in Sidney as the snow continues to be cleared from the roads

Sidney work crews started early on Valentine’s Day, clearing snow from the town’s streets and sidewalks.

A work crew was seen cordoning off Second Street and using a backhoe to clear snow and sculpt the vast drifts, some taller than a metre, on the sidewalks.

ALSO READ: West Shore boathouse, with 100-year-old boat inside, partially breaks free during storm

Matt Youell, one of the workers tasked with clearing the town’s streets, said the last three days had been very tiring.

“We’re still clearing the snow but we’re worried now about flooding and where all this snow is going to go,” he said.

Melting snow is now the new challenge for Greater Victoria and across the Island.

Driving conditions were still hazardous on the Pat Bay Highway Thursday – with reports of black ice and another five to 10 centimetres of snow in the forecast. Many vehicles were still iced into their driveways or stuck in parking lots.

RELATED: Economic impact of a snow day could be millions, say business leaders

North Saanich Fire Chief John Trelford said the temperature and geography of the Saanich Peninsula would hopefully minimize any flooding.

“If it stays cold, the snow will melt slow and it will be fine. If it gets warmer we could see some drainage issues,” he said. “Some ditches won’t be able to keep up and the odd basement and low lying areas, but we don’t tend to see too much flooding here.”

Earlier in the week, Environment and Climate Change Canada meteorologist Armel Castellan predicted that drainage and collapsing roofs from snow build up would be the next challenges people faced, especially as the temperature could rise quickly to 5 C.

RELATED: Snow a boon to some North Saanich businesses

The lost business, due to the snow, has been estimated at costing the Saanich Peninsula millions of dollars, but things seem to be getting back to normal, with Beacon Avenues’ shops and cafes almost all open Thursday morning.



nick.murray@peninsulanewsreview.com

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Workmen clearing snow from Second Street at approximately 8 a.m. on Feb.14. (Nick Murray/News Staff).

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