An artist’s sketch depicts Gabriel Klein in court during his fitness hearing on April 19 at B.C. Supreme Court in New Westminster. (Sketch by Sheila Allan)

An artist’s sketch depicts Gabriel Klein in court during his fitness hearing on April 19 at B.C. Supreme Court in New Westminster. (Sketch by Sheila Allan)

Accused found unfit for murder trial over B.C. school stabbing

Gabriel Klein is set to appear before the B.C. Review Board again in mid-January

UPDATED: 9:40 a.m., Sept. 13

The decision to hold off a man’s second-degree murder and aggravated assault trial for at least four more months “isn’t surprising” but leaves the family of one of the victims “on a bit of a hamster wheel,” a family representative says.

Gabriel Klein, accused of killing one student and seriously injuring another in a stabbing at Abbotsford Secondary School, is unfit to stand trial, the B.C. Review Board has found in a disposition this week that offered nothing on the board’s deliberation on the matter.

“That was quite evident. The challenge the family has is they’re almost on a bit of a hamster wheel for the next little while, where this will now be in January … to see if Klein can get healthier. It just means the family has to come back in four months and then maybe three to six months after that and then maybe a year after that. There’s really no closure,” said Dave Teixeira, representative of one victim’s family.

“This is only phase one. All these hearings have nothing to do with guilt or innocence. This is everything to do with just is he ready for trial? … It’s conceivable that he would never get to trial. It’s also conceivable that he would never get to trial in 20 years. So it’s a very, very frustrating process.”

Teixeira noted there was some understanding from the family of the victim that Klein is seriously mentally ill.

“As much as it’s frustrating, it makes sense that someone who’s going to stand trial needs to be able to assist in their defence. There’s really no issue with that,” Teixeira said.

“I think what the family, and certainly myself and others get frustrated [with] is how difficult the process is. … It’s just a strange process. There’s no guide to it; B.C. Review Board’s own website doesn’t make it easy.”

Teixeira also sees some positive out of last week’s hearing, which deliberated on whether or not Klein was malingering, or faking or exaggerating his symptoms.

“They’re not just taking his word for it, they’re not just looking passively by. They’re actually being quite inquisitive. And to me that shows that a system is working.”

ORIGINAL: 8:30 p.m., Sept. 11

The man accused of killing one student and seriously injuring another in a stabbing at an Abbotsford high school is unfit to stand trial, the B.C. Review Board has found.

But Gabriel Klein will return before the board for another hearing on the matter on Jan. 15, 2019, according to Dave Teixeira, spokesperson for the family of one of the victims. The decision has not been publicly released, but Teixeira said it will be released on Wednesday.

READ MORE: Man charged in Abbotsford school stabbing still too psychotic, doctors say

The ruling comes with little surprise — neither Crown nor defence argued that Klein is currently unfit to stand trial. That arose from evidence from two separate doctors, both of whom indicated Klein was not fit.

However, the doctors differed in their diagnoses. Klein’s treating psychiatrist at Colony Farm, where his hearing was held and where Klein is being held, told the B.C. Review Board that Klein was experiencing disorganized thinking. That thought disorder effectively makes it too difficult for Klein to concentrate on proceedings around him, Dr. Marcel Hediger said in last week’s hearing.

RELATED: Man charged in Abbotsford school stabbing found unfit to stand trial

He also diagnosed Klein with schizophrenia. While an independent doctor, Andrew Kolchak, focused more on Klein’s “severe” psychosis — disagreeing that Klein’s elusive mind was to the extent of disorganized thinking — he was more “conservative” in not also diagnosing Klein with schizophrenia.

Teixeira, too, noted some understanding from the family of the victim that Klein is seriously mentally ill.

Where the Crown and defence differed, however, was when the Review Board should reconvene. Crown suggested the matter return in four months — compared with the defence’s and Colony Farm’s suggestion of six months — pointing largely to the question of malingering, or faking one’s symptoms.

RELATED: No decision on Abbotsford school stabbing suspect’s mental fitness for trial

Kolchak noted in the hearing last week that there was some chance that Klein could be malingering, and there are tests psychiatrists can run to determine that. But he also noted that Klein’s psychosis was too severe at this time to provide an accurate result for that test.

Hediger told the board that Klein, who had previously refused medications, was now complying and taking those medications. But he said it could take three to six months for Klein’s mental state to stabilize, forming much of the basis for the defence’s suggestion of six months before another hearing.

Following the hearing, Teixeira addressed reporters, saying the family does want to see the matter move forward. But he was cautious about rushing into another hearing, before Klein’s had a chance to stabilize enough to head back to court.

Report an error or send us your tips, photos and video.

Dustin Godfrey | Reporter

@dustinrgodfrey

Send Dustin an email.
Like the Abbotsford News on Facebook.
Follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

BC Coroners Service is currently investigating a death at Canoe Cove Marina and Boatyard in North Saanich. (Black Press Media File)
Drowning death of North Saanich likely first in B.C. for 2021

Investigation into suspected drowning Monday night continues

Sidney's Beacon Wharf
Pontoon company piqued at prospect of public-private partnership around Sidney wharf

Seagate approached to submit proposeal for public-private partnership

Located at 9750 West Saanich Rd., this North Saanich mansion is on the market for $10.25 million. (Realtor.ca photo)
Located at 9750 West Saanich Rd., this North Saanich mansion is on the market for $8.65 million. (Realtor.ca photo)
The five most expensive homes for sale in Greater Victoria

A roundup of luxury estates currently on the market

Jimmy Fallon joked that a woman’s 4.5-star review of a Langford jail is “the most Canadian thing you could do” in The Tonight Show Jan. 21. (Screenshot/YouTube)
VIDEO: Jimmy Fallon jokes Canadian jails are basically hotels following woman’s 4.5-star review

Woman gave handwritten card to police following stay in Langford cells

The District of Saanich’s communications team decided to take part in a viral trend on Thursday and photoshopped U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders into a staff meeting photo. (District of Saanich/Twitter)
Bernie Sanders makes guest appearance at Saanich staff meeting

Sidney firefighters jump on viral trend of photoshopped U.S. senator

Toronto Public Health nurse Lalaine Agarin sets up for mass vaccination clinic in Toronto, Jan. 17, 2021. B.C. is set to to begin its large-scale immunization program for the general public starting in April. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
B.C.’s COVID-19 mass vaccinations expected to start in April

Clinics to immunize four million people by September

Terry Keogh, an RDN Transit driver, used his paramedic skills the morning of Jan. 22 after coming across an unconscious woman along his route in downtown Nanaimo. (RDN Transit photo)
Nanaimo transit driver stops his bus and helps get overdosing woman breathing again

Former EMT from Ireland performed CPR on a woman in downtown Nanaimo on Friday

Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam speaks during a daily briefing in Ottawa. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld)
31 cases of COVID-19 variants detected in Canada: Health officials

Dr. Theresa Tam made announces 13 more variant COVID-19 cases in Canada

An Atlantic salmon is seen during a Department of Fisheries and Oceans fish health audit at the Okisollo fish farm near Campbell River, B.C. in 2018. The First Nations Leadership Council says an attempt by industry to overturn the phasing out of salmon farms in the Discovery Islands in contrary to their inherent Title and Rights. (THE CANADIAN PRESS /Jonathan Hayward photo)
First Nations Leadership Council denounces attempt to overturn salmon farm ban

B.C.’s producers filed for a judicial review of the Discovery Islands decision Jan. 18

Daily COVID-19 cases reported to each B.C. health region, to Jan. 20, 2021. Island Health in blue, Northern Health green, Interior Health orange, Vancouver Coastal in red and Fraser Health in purple. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control)
B.C.’s COVID-19 infection rate stays stable with 508 cases Friday

Vaccine delivered to more than 110,000 high-risk people

More than 100 B.C. fishermen, fleet leaders, First Nations leaders and other salmon stakeholders are holding a virtual conference Jan. 21-22 to discuss a broad-range of issues threatening the commercial salmon fishery. (Black Press file photo)
B.C. commercial salmon fishermen discuss cures for an industry on the brink

Two-day virtual conference will produce key reccomendations for DFO

Black Press file photo
Investigation at remote burned-out Vancouver Island cabin reveals human remains

Identity of victim not released, believed to be the owner of an SUV vehicle found parked nearby

Angela Waldick is the new team photographer for the Nanaimo NightOwls. (Nanaimo NightOwls photo)
Half-blind photographer will help new Island baseball team look picture-perfect

Nanaimo NightOwls say legally blind team photographer is making history

School District 57 headquarters in Prince George. (Mark Nielsen, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter)
Prince George school district settles with sexual abuse victim

Terms were part of an out-of-court settlement reached with Michael Bruneau, nearly four years after he filed a lawsuit

Most Read