Running to July 1, the Vital Signs survey will be used as the foundation for the 14th annual Vital Signs report, measuring the vitality of the region, identifying concerns, and supporting action on issues that are critical to quality of life in the Capital Region.

Your opinion matters: Why you need to take the Vital Signs survey

Victoria Foundation’s Vital Signs survey welcomes your input through July 1

What are your community’s most pressing issues?

That’s the question the Victoria Foundation asks residents from the West Shore to the Saanich Peninsula as it embarks on this year’s Vital Signs survey.

Considering everything from health care to homelessness, the annual survey measures the public’s perceptions of what’s working well in the region and what could use a little help. The two-month survey is open to everyone and the results, paired with local statistics, will form the foundation of the 14th annual Vital Signs report, an annual community check-up measuring the vitality of the Capital Region and supporting action on issues critical to quality of life.

Why take the Vital Signs survey?

Why take the survey?Because your opinion can directly impact local organizations working in your community!

“The combined results of our Vital Signs survey and local statistics are used both by decision-makers to guide programs and policy, and the Foundation to connect philanthropy to community needs and opportunities,” says Sandra Richardson, Victoria Foundation CEO. “Last year, in our continued mission to connect people who care with causes that matter, the Foundation distributed a record $2,235,053 to 106 charities in the Capital Region.”

While survey results often mirror the reality of what’s happening in the region – the cost of living is a prime example – sometimes they reveal a few surprises.

“Housing always receives a low grade,” explains the Foundation’s Rob Janus, “and we think that reflects the reality of what’s going on.”

However, while transportation regularly receives a lower grade from respondents, likely fuelled by concerns such as the Colwood Crawl and issues with Sooke Road or the Pat Bay Highway, for example, compared to communities across BC and Canada, Victoria actually fares well with both availability of public transit and overall commute times, Janus says.

The survey also helps track changes in the public’s concerns. While housing, cost of living, transportation and mental illness have consistently appeared near the top of people’s concerns in recent years, last year showed climate change jump to ninth spot from 14 the year before.

Take the survey today – it’s easier than ever!

This year’s survey – open through July 1 – is easier than ever to take – simply visit victoriafoundation.ca and follow the link to the survey, which only takes about 10 minutes to complete.

***

Established in 1936, the Victoria Foundation is Canada’s second oldest community foundation and the sixth largest of nearly 200 nation-wide. Managing charitable gifts from donors whose generosity allows them to create permanent, income-earning funds, proceeds from these funds are distributed as grants for charitable or educational purposes. To date the Victoria Foundation has invested more than $225 million in people, projects and non-profit organizations strengthening communities and is committed to Connecting People Who Care with Causes that Matter.

 

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