Some public hearings get better turnout than others. The Sidney Community Association wants the municipality to better publicize local ‘significant’ projects. (Steven Heywood/News staff file)

Sidney’s ‘significant’ projects need exposure

Coun. Peter Wainwright agrees with some citizens’ group ideas

Concerns over limited public awareness of ‘significant’ projects in Sidney have prompted one councillor to ask for a broader discussion on the issue.

Coun. Peter Wainwright asked municipal staff to review a series of recommendations made by the Sidney Community Association (SCA) earlier in January, following a public presentation made by the Jocelyn Gifford, president of the SCA, on what they called significant projects in town. He said he found the SCA’s feedback on the issue constructive, adding he found himself supporting some of their ideas.

Wainwright, in a presentation to council, noted that the term ‘significant projects’ refers to proposals for new buildings, or major renovations to existing buildings, in Sidney’s commercial area — mainly the downtown core — regardless of number of storeys.

The Community Association, Wainwright outlined, is recommending proponents of such projects hold public meetings to present these types of developments, prior to the submission of complete applications by a developer to the Town. Wainwright added it would be hard to enforce this, as a proponent could simply “go through the motions”.

The SCA also asked that significant development proposals be advertised by the Town in the local paper, much like what’s done for rezoning and official community plan variances. Wainwright recommended the Town consider doing so, unless there’s a planned public hearing on the project, which brings with it advertising of its own.

Wainwright disagreed with the SCA on two more points: notifying the community when significant projects are to be discussed at a committee of the whole meeting (the Town already advertises these meetings on the Town’s website three to four days in advance), and; on showing pictures of a project to the community.

“I’m not in favour of this,” Wainwright stated, noting first drafts are always subject to change. “I feel that people should look at the final plans and not form an option based on an early illustration.”

Wainwright, in his report, agreed with the SCA that notices of new applications for significant projects be posted on the Town’s website, and that the radius for notices to go out on such developments be expanded to 225 metres.

Council voted in favour of having staff review the recommendations and reporting back at a later date for discussion on the impacts of those suggestions.



editor@peninsulanewsreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

North Saanich submits ALR exclusion despite large opposition

Opposed North Saanich residents now shift their attention to ALC after 6-1 council vote

Saanich calls for applicants to join Housing Strategy task force

Council to appoint ‘diverse group’ to tackle housing challenges

Court strikes down Sidney’s denial of proposed cannabis store

Justice Jennifer Power orders municipality to reconsider application and pay court costs

VicPD seeking witnesses for fatal crash on Hillside Avenue

A pedestrian was taken to hospital with life-threatening injuries, where she later died

21 new COVID-19 cases confirmed in B.C. as virus ‘silently circulates’ in broader community

Health officials urge British Columbians to enjoy summer safely as surge continues

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers wanted list for the week of July 13

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Tough time for tree fruits as some B.C. farm products soar

Province reports record 2019 sales, largely due to cannabis

‘Let’s all do a self-check’: Okanagan mayor reacts to racist vandalism targeting local family

Home of Indo-Canadian family in Summerland was targeted on evening of July 13

Province agrees to multimillion-dollar payout for alleged victims of Kelowna social worker

Robert Riley Saunders is accused of misappropriating funds of children — often Indigenous — in his care

Feds fund safe drug supply pilot program for Cowichan

The opioid overdose crisis continues to be one of the most serious public health crises

B.C. businessman David Sidoo gets 3 months behind bars for college admissions scam

Sidoo was sentenced for hiring someone take the SATs in place of his two sons

PHOTOS: Inside a newly-listed $22M mega-mansion on ALR land in B.C.

The large home, located on ALR land, is one of the last new mansions to legally be built on ALR land

Most Read