Calvin Lechner, still playing music in Kelowna. Darren Hull photography

Calvin Lechner, still playing music in Kelowna. Darren Hull photography

Inspired People with Musician Calvin Lechner

Moving from music to marketing in the Okanagan

  • Sep. 24, 2018 9:40 a.m.

– Story by David Wylie Photography by Darren Hull

Story courtesy of Boulevard Magazine, a Black Press Media publication

Like Boulevard Magazine on Facebook and follow them on Instagram

Search the web for Calvin Lechner and you’ll find two distinct results: one is playing the drums on stage with jet-black shaggy hair, sunglasses and a leather jacket; the other smiles professionally at the camera, clean cut and looking spiffy in a suit and tie. You could be forgiven for thinking they are two different people.

“When I was applying for jobs, the question always came up in interviews — ‘Was this you?’” says Calvin in his Kelowna home studio. “Well, it was at one point.”

Calvin is currently the sales and marketing director for Kelowna’s Troika Developments. But before that, he was the drummer for Juno-nominated band Faber Drive.

“When I look back on it, it was a very strange time in my life,” he says. “It’s not that I would ever want to get rid of that side of my life. It’s just funny when they run into each other.”

Calvin, who grew up in Kitimat, started playing music when he was five years old. He took guitar lessons until he was 12 — that was the year his older brother got a drum kit for Christmas.

“I was obsessed with drums,” he says.

Calvin played in his first band, Anything August, while at Mount Elizabeth secondary school in Kitimat, and the group soon met music video producer Stephano Barberis, who has received at least 35 Director of the Year awards over his career so far. Though they met in Kelowna, they were excited about their “Kitimat connection,” and Barberis landed a $25,000 grant in 2005 to produce a video for Anything August that received airtime on MuchMusic.

“That’s what gave us our first push as kids,” says Calvin. “We were only about 16 or 17 when we started touring and didn’t focus on much else for the next six or seven years. We just really focussed on making a go of it. It was a crazy experience. We had no idea what we were doing. We were just rolling with the punches.”

The band moved to Kelowna where the music scene was blowing up, and a few of the bigger bands at the time had come from the Okanagan.

Calvin was drawn to the marketing aspects of growing a band, and Anything August soon became “Kings of MySpace” and networked with everyone they could.

“We were trying to get clever with how to get bigger shows, how to get on bigger bills,” he says.

Calvin started to promote concerts and paid bands to come to town so that Anything August could open for them.

Calvin Lechner, moving from music to marketing in Kelowna. Darren Hull photography

When he met Dave Faber, the lead singer of Faber Drive, everything changed. Faber eventually called him, needing a new drummer.

“That call imploded our band Anything August. It was an opportunity for me to go exactly where I saw my own career going. As much as I loved the guys I was playing with, it was something that I felt I had to do.”

The move changed Calvin’s life. He toured with Faber Drive, playing songs from the debut album, Seven Second Surgery, in front of big crowds. He also helped write Faber’s second album, Can’t Keep A Secret, which was nominated as Pop Album of the Year at the 2011 Juno Awards.

“It was a totally different game. We had management, we had booking agents, we had tour managers and stage managers. I wasn’t setting up my own drums anymore. We were signing autographs,” he says.

Despite the taste of music fame, being a part of Faber Drive wasn’t bringing Calvin joy in his life. He missed the business side of music. And looking back, he says, the band became too calculated, too formulaic.

“It took the magic out of it,” he says.

He left Faber Drive and moved back to Kitimat with his parents to recalibrate, deciding to pursue a future in marketing. Calvin says he made music to create a connection with others, and saw similarities between the two careers.

“That’s what I do today through marketing. Although it’s a completely different job, my approach is the same. There are a lot of parallels,” he says.

After leaving Faber Drive, he stopped playing music, and his drums gathered dust in a closet. Calvin was asked to join other bands, including well-known Canadian singer Carly Rae Jepson, but he told them he just couldn’t do it.

After a break, he started to dabble again, working alongside local Kelowna artists including award-winning winemaker Jason Parkes in the band Proper Man.

“My favourite thing to do as a musician is the session work.

I don’t like to be the centre of attention, so I really like being able to add that little something that can really help elevate an already-great artist,” he says. “The goal is to make your music and have as many people hear it as possible. If you can accomplish that, I think that’s the dream … doing what you love to do and finding a way to be able to make that a bigger part of your life.”

Calvin is currently in a cover band called The Feels, playing an atypical selection, including songs by the Backstreet Boys, New Kids on the Block, Beatles and Hall & Oates.

Their website is rightinthefeels.ca

To see more of Darren Hull’s photography check out his site here.

Calvin LechnerDarren Hull PhotographydevelopmentDrummerFaber DriveKelownaMarketingMusicmusicianOkanaganOkanagan BoulevardThe FeelsTroika Developments

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Staff and volunteers at the Shaw Centre for the Salish Sea were disappointed by the theft of an educational porpoise skull likely taken on Jan. 8. (Courtesy of Tina Kelly)
Well-loved porpoise skull stolen from Sidney aquarium

Skull had been used for youth and visitor education and outreach for years

A female prisoner sent Langford police officers a thank-you card after she spent days in their custody. (Twitter/West Shore RCMP)
Woman gives Victoria-area jail 4.5-star review in handwritten card to police after arrest

‘We don’t often get thank you cards from people who stay with us, but this was sure nice to see’: RCMP

The Starbucks in Langford’s Westshore Town Centre is one of almost 300 storefronts that the U.S. coffee giant will be shutting across Canada by the end of March. (Google Maps)
Langford’s Westshore Town Centre Starbucks to close permanently

Popular coffee chain to close 300 storefronts across Canada by end of March

An Oak Bay Police officer handed out five tickets for “fail to obey stop sign” and two tickets for using a cell phone while driving, all within two hours at King George Terrace on Jan. 11. (Oak Bay Police Twitter)
Man confronts unmasked group at Oak Bay Marina

Oak Bay police issue plenty of tickets in short King George Terrace visit

A senior official with Victoria International Airport says the airport is still researching COVID-19 testing regimes but predicts testing and screening will remain part of the aviation industry even after vaccines have rolled out. (Black Press Media file photo)
Victoria International Airport researching COVID-19 testing options

Senior official predicts ‘screening and testing will be around long after the vaccination rollout’

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry prepares a daily update on the coronavirus pandemic, April 21, 2020. (B.C. Government)
B.C. adjusts COVID-19 vaccine rollout for delivery slowdown

Daily cases decline over weekend, 31 more deaths

An elk got his antlers caught up in a zip line in Youbou over the weekend. (Conservation Officer Service Photo)
Elk rescued from zip line in Youbou on Vancouver Island

Officials urge people to manage items on their property that can hurt animals

A Trail man has a lucky tin for a keepsake after it saved him from a stabbing last week. File photo
Small tin in Kootenay man’s jacket pocket saved him from stabbing: RCMP

The man was uninjured thanks to a tin in his jacket

Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation Chantel Moore, 26, was fatally shot by a police officer during a wellness check in the early morning of June 4, 2020, in Edmundston, N.B. (Facebook)
Frustrated family denied access to B.C. Indigenous woman’s police shooting report

Independent investigation into B.C. woman’s fatal shooting in New Brunswick filed to Crown

Delta Police Constable Jason Martens and Dezi, a nine-year-old German Shepherd that recently retired after 10 years with Delta Police. (Photo submitted)
Dezi, a Delta police dog, retires on a high note after decade of service

Nine-year-old German Shepherd now fights over toys instead of chasing down bad guys

Nurses collect samples from a patient in a COVID suspect room in the COVID-19 intensive care unit at St. Paul’s hospital in downtown Vancouver, Tuesday, April 21, 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)
5 British Columbians under 20 years old battled COVID-19 in ICU in recent weeks

Overall hospitalizations have fallen but young people battling the virus in hospital has increased

Canada released proposed regulations Jan. 2 for the fisheries minister to maintain Canada’s major fish stocks at sustainable levels and recover those at risk. (File photo)
New laws would cement DFO accountability to depleted fish stocks

Three B.C. salmon stocks first in line for priority attention under proposed regulations

Trees destroyed a Shoreacres home during a wind storm Jan. 13, 2021. Photo: Submitted
Kootenay woman flees just before tree crushes house

Pamala DeRosa is thankful to be alive

Gin, one of the Kantymirs’ two sheep. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)
Sheep start up ATV, sit in cars and go for walks in Salmon Arm

Until they bought two sheep, Ken and Karleen Kantymir didin’t realize just how social the animals are

Most Read