Green Party of Canada leader Elizabeth May celebrates her party winning three seats at the Green Party of Canada’s election night party at the Crystal Gardens in Victoria. (Arnold Lim / Black Press) B.C. October 21, 2019.

Green Party of Canada leader Elizabeth May celebrates her party winning three seats at the Green Party of Canada’s election night party at the Crystal Gardens in Victoria. (Arnold Lim / Black Press) B.C. October 21, 2019.

Regional election results in Greater Victoria retain the status quo

NDP retains three out of four seats in Greater Victoria

Federal Green Party leader Elizabeth May did not mince words when she spoke to reporters late Monday night after voters in Saanich–Gulf Islands sent her back to Ottawa.

May said she has no “doubt” a targeted New Democratic campaign “flooding our mailboxes and airwaves with untruths about the Green Party” robbed her party of a stronger showing in Greater Victoria, where internal polls had shown “very strong leads” in the ridings of Victoria and Esquimalt-Saanich-Sooke.

“We really learned some things,” she said. “We didn’t think that smears and attacks would be sufficient to erode the leads we had. So we were wrong and we didn’t respond in kind. We basically didn’t respond at all. We assumed that voters would be as outraged as we were.”

Speaking to reporters earlier, she even spoke of “concentrated campaigns of disinformation” aimed only at Vancouver Island seats.

RELATED: Federal Green party leader Elizabeth May takes Saanich-Gulf Islands

With these comments, May referred to advertisements and flyers, which suggested the Greens would prop up a Conservative minority government and curtail abortion rights. New Democratic officials, for their part, defended the advertisements, which appeared in the final days of the campaign and further intensified the verbal sparring between May and NDP leader Jagmeet Singh.

The sparring also confirmed the regional race in Greater Victoria was between the New Democrats and the Greens, who had hoped to turn the region into a springboard for greater national recognition. In the end, the New Democrats prevailed by holding off Green challenges in Victoria, Esquimalt-Saanich-Sooke, and Cowichan-Malahat-Langford.

RELATED: WATCH: NDP Laurel Collins elected in Victoria

RELATED: Garrison re-elected in Esquimalt-Saanich-Sooke

In Victoria, Coun. Laurel Collins won 33.2 per cent of the vote, ahead of Green Racelle Kooy, who won 29.7 per cent, to retain a seat that New Democrats have held since 2006. Collins will take the place of former MP Murray Rankin, who had held the seat for seven years. In Esquimalt-Saanich-Sooke, Randall Garrison returns to Ottawa after winning his third straight election, beating Green David Merner by a margin of 34.1 per cent to 26.3 per cent. Greens had identified both ridings as pick-ups. Sharing a stage with May at Victoria’s Crystal Gardens on election night, both Kooy and Merner told the audience that they had not seen the last of them.

Less competitive was the race in Cowichan-Malahat-Langford, where New Democratic incumbent Alistair Macgregor defended the seat he had won in 2015, beating Conservative Alana DeLong by a margin of 36.2 per cent to 25.8 per cent, with Green candidate Lydia Hwitsum coming in third place with 20.2 per cent of the vote.

Ultimately, New Democrats retained the three out of four Greater Victoria seats they held before the writ dropped. Looking across Vancouver Island, they retained five out of seven ridings with a connection to Vancouver Island (North Island-Powell River straddles Vancouver Island and the northern coast of the mainland).

Greens, meanwhile, retained both of the ridings they held before the election: May’s riding of Saanich Gulf-Islands and Paul Manly’s riding of Nanaimo-Ladysmith, which he had won in a byelection held in May.

Merner had predicted at the time that Manly’s victory would help spark a Green wave. In the end, the status quo prevailed.

Jamie Lawson, associate professor of political science at the University of Victoria, acknowledged the Greens did not have the breakthrough they had anticipated but also added that they can take some comfort in the fact that they showed strength in Atlantic Canada.


Like us on Facebook and follow @wolfgang_depner

wolfgang.depner@peninsulanewsreview.com

Cowichan–Malahat–LangfordEsquimalt–Saanich–SookeSaanich–Gulf IslandsVictoria electoral district

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Johnathan Lee Robichaud pleaded guilty to eight charges including sex-related offences against children and accessing, possessing and making or publishing child pornography. (Courtesy of Saanich Police)
Sentencing date moved for Saanich nanny guilty of child porn charges

Johnathon Lee Robichaud pleaded guilty to eight sex offences against children

(Google Maps)
Sophisticated glass-removal crime returns to downtown Victoria

Several businesses on Fort Street targeted overnight, say police

Eligible non-profit organizations and charities apply for support through North Saanich’s COVID-19 relief until Feb. 12.(Black Press Media file photo)
North Saanich lays out criteria for grants to non-profits

Eligible applicants can apply for an unlimited amount to help ease effects of COVID-19

(Black Press Media file photo)
Saanich repeals, reschedules two public hearings for consideration of new information

Move to hold public hearings for second time ‘very rare,’ mayor says

Health Minister Adrian Dix and provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry head for the press theatre at the B.C. legislature for an update on COVID-19, Jan. 7, 2021. (B.C. government)
B.C.’s COVID-19 spread steady with 509 new cases Friday

Hospitalized and critical care cases decline, nine deaths

Seasonal influenza vaccine is administered starting each fall in B.C. and around the world. (Langley Advance Times)
After 30,000 tests, influenza virually nowhere to be found in B.C.

COVID-19 precautions have eliminated seasonal infection

Chief public health officer Dr. Theresa Tam provides an update on the COVID-19 pandemic in Ottawa on Friday, Jan. 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Canada’s top doctor says to avoid non-essential travel as B.C. explores legal options

Premier John Horgan says he is seeking legal advice on whether it can limit interprovincial travel

Lilly and Poppy, two cats owned by Kalmar Cat Hotel ownder Donna Goodenough, both have cerebellAr hypoplasia, a genetic neurological condition that affects their ability to control their muscles and bones. Photo by Alistair Taylor – Campbell River Mirror
VIDEO: Wobbly Cats a riot of flailing legs and paws but bundles of love and joy to their owner

Woman urges others to not fear adopting cats with disabilities

Martin Luther King Jr. addresses the crowd during the march on Washington, D.C., in August of 1963. Courtesy photo
Government reinforces importance of anti-racism act on Black Shirt Day

B.C. Ministers say education “a powerful tool” in the fight for equity and equality

A northern resident killer whale shows injuries sustained by a collision with a vessel in B.C. waters. (Photo supplied by Ocean Wise Conservation Association)
Coast Guard ramps up protections for B.C. whales

First-ever Marine Mammal Desk will enhance cetacean reporting and enforcement

Dr. Shannon Waters, the medical health officer for the Cowichan Valley Region, is reminding people to stay the course with COVID-19 measures. (File photo)
‘Stay the course’ with COVID measures, Island Health reminds

Limit social activity, wash hands, wear a mask, and isolate if you feel sick

Jobs Minister Ravi Kahlon shared a handwritten note his son received on Jan. 13, 2021. (Ravi Kahlon/Twitter)
Proud dad moment: B.C. minister’s son, 10, receives handwritten note for act of kindness

North Delta MLA took to Twitter to share a letter his son received from a new kid at school

Cowichan Tribes members line up at a drive-up clinic on Wednesday, Jan. 13 to receive the first doses of the COVID-19 vaccine in the region. (Kevin Rothbauer/Citizen)
BCAFN condems racism against Cowichan Tribes after COVID-19 outbreak

“Any one of us could do everything right and still catch the virus”: Regional Chief Terry Teegee.

Most Read