The Finest of the Fine with Sidney Fine Art Show

Some of the top artists visit Sidney for a large display of spectacular pieces.

Patrons of the arts can browse hundreds of creations by local and regional artists at the Sidney Fine Art Show.

This year’s Sidney Fine Art Show will feature 383 pieces of original art — juried out of 1,100 submitted works.

It’s a large undertaking for the organizers of the juried show, taking place Oct. 16 to 18 at the Bodine Hall at the Mary Winspear Centre in Sidney. They also put invitations out to 242 artists, representing the bulk of the people whose works will be on display.

Paintings, carvings, pottery and three dimensional items will be just a few of the magnificent pieces  displayed and for sale at the event.

An awards night will take place on Oct. 15 before the show opens to the public. It’s for all of the artists plus the 200 volunteers with the Community Arts Council of the Saanich Peninsula (CACSP). That night they will have awards for Best in Show, Best Photograph, Best Art Under Glass and more.

Patrons, individuals who have gone out to raise money for the show and have paid for the privilege, will get a first viewing along with the first chance to purchase the art.

The Sidney Fine Art Show itself  has a $6 admission fee for each day or $10 for a three-day pass.

Again this year, CACSP organizers begin the event with local wine tastings on Friday night. Called ‘Celebrate Local Night,’ it runs from 7 to 9 p.m. on the Friday with local wineries.

On Saturday from 7 to 9 p.m., there will be a meet-the- artist session, where the artists will stand by their artwork for members of the community to stop by and ask questions.

President of CACSP, Richard Julien, said there will be a dozen master artists in attendance. These are artists who have received awards at the Sidney Fine Art Show twice (the requirement to qualify).

Last year, the Fine Art Show brought in around 8,000 individuals over the three day period and it’s expected to be a good turnout again.

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