Development Cost Charges (DCCs) are fees collected from developers to help fund the cost of growth-related infrastructure and parks. Nvision’s five-storey, 95-unit rental building at 433 Boleskine Rd. in Saanich. (Black Press File Photo)

New Saanich bylaw to reduce cost to taxpayers for infrastructure upgrades

Bylaw governing development cost charges has not had a major update since 1998

Saanich council unanimously passed a new bylaw to increase development cost charges (DCCs) Monday night. This bylaw would ensure developers pay their fair share towards the cost of public infrastructure upgrades, which get more expensive and are required more often as the population grows.

Coun. Nathalie Chambers said taxpayers have been contributing the bulk of funds needed for infrastructure upgrades through property taxes they pay to the district each year, and this new bylaw would ensure everyone pays their fair share.

READ ALSO: Municipalities want fair share of cannabis taxes

DCCs are fees collected from property developers to help fund upgrades to infrastructure and parks to keep up with the needs of growing communities in B.C. by charging developers according to how much of a burden on infrastructure new buildings will pose. This includes road improvements, active transportation upgrades, sewer and water infrastructure, water drainage systems, and parks.

Chambers said DCCs are a “glaring source” of funds not being collected in the District. She said there are over 8,000 properties expected to be built in the District over the next 20 years. She said the bylaw has already been delayed for six months, at the cost of the taxpayer.

“It’s about making sure everyone pays their fair share,” Chambers said. “In that six months, the taxpayer has contributed about $2 million. By not paying higher DCCs, developers are forwarding the cost onto future generations.”

The District of Saanich’s supplemental report on DCCs dated Nov. 14 notes that Saanich now has new information on factors that influence DCC rates including: population and growth estimates, servicing requirements, construction and land acquisition costs, and growth-related infrastructure and park needs. This includes more current population statistics from the 2016 Census.

The existing DCC bylaw was created in 1997. An amendment bylaw was passed in 2016 to delete some properties from the DCC bylaw schedule. Cordova Bay is now also considered to be on an area-specific basis for DCC rates, separate from the rest of the District.

The bylaw will now go to the provincial government for approval, but council does not yet have an indication of how long that will take nor how much it will cost taxpayers in the meantime. If approved, the new bylaw will replace the one from 1997.

READ ALSO: Watchdog group says Saanich council needs a ‘reality check’ about taxes

sophie.heizer@saanichnews.com


Like us on Facebook and follow @yrlocaljourno

developmentinfrastructureSaanich

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Canadian warship HCMS Regina sails past Sidney

The vessel recently returned from the world’s largest naval exercise

Wildfire smoke expected to blanket Greater Victoria again

Conditions expected to worsen Wednesday afternoon but not approach levels reached a few weeks ago

‘Bonnie’ and ‘Henry’ among latest litter of service dog puppies

B.C. Alberta Guide Dogs names two pups after provincial health officer

Reader photos: Sun rises and sets over Oak Bay

Sunrise from an early morning yoga session at Oak Bay Beach Hotel… Continue reading

Former Victoria Royals manager celebrates Stanley Cup win

Grant Armstrong is now an amateur scout with Tampa Bay Lightning

105 new COVID-19 cases, 1 death as health officials urge B.C. to remember safety protocols

There are currently 1268 active cases, with 3,337 people under public health monitoring

Orange Shirt Day lessons of past in today’s classrooms

Phyllis Webstad, who attended St. Joseph’s Mission Residential School in British Columbia, is credited for creating the movement

Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Greens’ Furstenau fires at NDP, Liberals on pandemic recovery, sales tax promise

She also criticized the NDP economic recovery plan, arguing it abandons the tourism industry

U.S. Presidential Debate Takeaways: An acrid tone from the opening minute

Here are key takeaways from the first of three scheduled presidential debates before Election Day on Nov. 3

B.C. nurses report rise in depression, anxiety, exhaustion due to pandemic

A new UBC study looks into how the COVID-19 response has impacted frontline nurses

Shoplifting suspect allegedly spits on worker at store in Nanaimo

Suspect became aggressive when confronted by loss prevention officer at Walmart, say RCMP

Most Read