Benefactors of growth can afford to pay more

Top income earners could fund much of B.C.'s deficit reduction

Re: Here comes the tax, man (Our View, Feb. 1)

The editorial said, “British Columbians now have to decide what they value more: services or disposable income – or find a balance between the two.”

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives report referred to, “Progressive Tax Options for B.C. – Reform Ideas for Raising New Revenues and Enhancing Fairness,” actually said that we could have more disposable income and more social services.

The report made a plea for progressive taxation. It’s fair for the benefactors of B.C.’s recent economic growth to give a little more to the common pool, since their taxes are lower than the rest of Canada. This would raise needed program revenue, reduce income inequality and increase disposable income.

If the top six per cent of B.C. residents, those with incomes over $103,000, paid a fair tax share, we would raise $930 million. That would build 2,000 social housing units annually, pay increased welfare to cover food and housing, support families by properly funding ministry programs, restore school class sizes to 2007 levels and increase post-secondary education funding by 10 per cent.

The Centre also said for the price of a cup of coffee each a day, we’d raise $2.3 billion for substantial investment in a number of areas.

It did sound like a few people might have to forgo that extra yacht, Maserati or vacation mansion, including me.

Larry Wartel

Victoria