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Coast guard christens new vessel

CCGS Cape Naden, shown underway off Esquimalt Harbour, was officially introduced at Pat Bay recently. - Photo courtesy Canadian Coast Guard
CCGS Cape Naden, shown underway off Esquimalt Harbour, was officially introduced at Pat Bay recently.
— image credit: Photo courtesy Canadian Coast Guard

Three new Coast Guard ships were officially introduced recently — one in Peninsula waters.

“Today’s dedication of Canadian Coast Guard Ship Cape Naden is a clear demonstration of our government’s commitment to the Canadian Coast Guard and making sure that our Coast Guard officers have the tools they need to do their job,” said Keith Ashfield — Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and Minister for the Atlantic Gateway. “These new vessels are a great addition to the Coast Guard fleet and are being used extensively for search and rescue operations throughout Canada. The enhanced capabilities of the vessels is now considered the service standard for coastal inshore operations in the Pacific region.”

The three new vessels are among five 47-foot motor lifeboats constructed by Victoria Shipyards as part of a $19.6 million contract under Canada’s Economic Action Plan. The other two vessels were delivered to Quebec and Ontario.

In BC, the CCGS Cape Palmerston was officially named and dedicated at a ceremony at Campbell River at the end of June, while CCGS Cape Dauphin will be officially named and dedicated at a ceremony at Prince Rupert at the end of July. The new vessels replace two older vessels which are being retired from service.

“The Cape Class lifeboat design has consistently proven to be highly capable and effective, making it the service standard for coastal inshore operations across Canada,” said Dan Bate, communications officer for Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Canadian Coast Guard. “Since its introduction, vessels of this design have been used extensively for search and rescue operations at eight of Coast Guard’s 11 stations on the Pacific coast.”

The new vessels are designed to operate safely in maximum storm conditions with a continuous wind speed of up to 80 knots and associated seas of up to 12 metres. The vessels are self-bailing and self-righting, allowing for safer operation in rough conditions.

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