Entertainment

Peninsula Players present infidelity awry

Peninsula Players actors Alicia Andrews, Rob LeBlanc, Celia Francis and Remi Lavictoire (standing) prepare an awkward dining scene for How the Other Half Loves. - Peninsula Players photo
Peninsula Players actors Alicia Andrews, Rob LeBlanc, Celia Francis and Remi Lavictoire (standing) prepare an awkward dining scene for How the Other Half Loves.
— image credit: Peninsula Players photo

For nearly half of the Peninsula Players’ existence, Sid Clarke has directed plays for the community theatre group. The group celebrates 60 years this season, and this weekend, Clarke celebrates opening his latest production, How The Other Half Loves by Alan Ayckbourn. It’s the grand finale of the Players’ season.

“This play is one that the English dramatist wrote for the New York stage and is considered one of his most innovative,” Clarke said. “There are three married couples with the men all working for the same firm. The problem is that one of the younger men is having an affair with the wife of the boss. When each returns home early one morning, there is a need to invent an acceptable explanation that is based on their cooked up story of trying to smooth over infidelity in the marriage of the third couple.”

An unusual stage set provides difficulty for Clarke, but intrigue for the audience.

“The living rooms of two couples is shown on one set with a common dining area that serves as the place for two dinners simultaneously taking place on two different nights,” Clarke explained. “When the third couple show up, the fat is in the fire with the real reason for the all-night absences being gradually exposed.”

The play opens at Berwick Theatre on Friday, May 18 and comes to the Saanich Peninsula on Friday, May 25.

“It’s a good play. It’s a difficult play … it’s convoluted,” Clarke said.

How the Other Half Loves is the grand finale of the Peninsula Players’ 60th season.

“A part of community well being and community health is the artistic content. This is really a healthy community and the theatre wants to be part of that,” said Clarke, who has been with the Players for 26 years. “Community theatre, probably because of its voluntary nature and potential to entertain and foster local artistic talent, has been a constant feature in many Canadian communities.”

In the past 60 years the Peninsula Players troupe added almost 150 productions to the health of the community, and Clark anticipates things could go well for decades more.

“If we’ve got venues we can survive,” he said. “You can always get people to do the artistic stuff.”

Find links to online ticket orders for performances at Berwick Theatre and Charlie White Theatre at peninsulaplayers.bc.ca.

 

Two venues

Berwick auditorium

• Friday, May 18, 7:30 p.m.

• Saturday, May 19, 7:30 p.m.

• Sunday, May 20, 2 p.m.

Charlie White Theatre

• Friday, May 25, 7:30 p.m.

• Saturday, May 26, 7:30 p.m.

• Sunday, May 27, 2 p.m.

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

You might like ...

Shirley Valentine an escape hatch from the daily grind
 
Pride and Prejudice comes to Langham Court Theatre
 
Theatre fun times four at 4-Play
Prosit! Share a pint at Oktoberfest
 
Maritime music mixed wih the blues
 
Crafter back at Alberni mill for light fest
Harvest Fun
 
Gurr concert cancelled
 
Laughs galore in B2B’s Anne of Green Gables

Community Events, September 2014

Add an Event

Read the latest eEdition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Sep 19 edition online now. Browse the archives.